2019-11-05: NH State Register of Historic Places adds eight properties, including five from Litchfield’s town center2019-11-05T08:51:20-05:00

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: November 5, 2019

Shelly Angers, N.H. Department of Natural & Cultural Resources
603-271-3136
shelly.angers@dncr.nh.gov
Twitter: @NHDNCR

NH State Register of Historic Places adds eight properties, including five from Litchfield’s town center

The New Hampshire Division of Historical Resources is pleased to announce that the State Historical Resources Council has added eight properties to the New Hampshire State Register of Historic Places.

For the first time, five buildings from Litchfield have been added to the register; they are located consecutively next to each other on Route 3A, creating a town center that has served most community functions for generations. The properties include: the Gothic Revival Litchfield Presbyterian Church (1844), Greek Revival Litchfield Town Hall (1851), Tudor Revival Aaron Cutler Memorial Library (1924), Colonial Revival Griffin Memorial School (1930) and the mid-twentieth century Litchfield Fire Station (1958).

Each building has been integral to the development of Litchfield’s identity, contributing to the town’s social fabric by serving as places for community gatherings, celebrations, education and more.

Three other properties were also recently listed to New Hampshire’s State Register:

George Burrell’s Residence in Keene includes an 1853 predominantly brick Italianate-style house that has wooden double doors with stained glass for the front entry, a full bay window on the front and arched windows below the gable. Its detached Stick-style carriage house is also architecturally significant. The property is located on Washington Street, which is known for its 19th-century homes in a variety of styles.

The one-story Willing Workers Hall in Warren has served as the social hall for the local Willing Workers charitable organization from the time that it was built for that purpose in 1915. The building has two primary spaces inside: an auditorium that includes a stage, and a kitchen that still has a large cookstove, original cupboards and tin farmer’s sink.

Westmoreland’s Federal-style Brick Church was built in 1838 soon after an earlier church was burned under suspicious circumstances. Constructed primarily of locally made brick, it has a clapboarded gable-front pediment, two wood-paneled entry doors with large windows above them and a two-tiered square bell tower.

Anyone wishing to nominate a property to the New Hampshire State Register of Historic Places must research the history of the nominated property and document it on an individual inventory form from the New Hampshire Division of Historical Resources. Having a property listed in the Register does not impose restrictions on property owners. For more information, visit nh.gov/nhdhr.

New Hampshire’s Division of Historical Resources, the State Historic Preservation Office, was established in 1974 and is part of the NH Department of Natural and Cultural Resources. NHDHR’s mission is to preserve and celebrate New Hampshire’s irreplaceable historic resources through programs and services that provide education, stewardship, and protection. For more information, visit us online at nh.gov/nhdhr or by calling 603-271-3483.

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